RESEARCH 

 

I am fortunate to have the opportunity to work on several different research projects in an array of subjects related to my interest. I’m happy to say that some of my hard work has paid off, and of course not forgetting the people who have walked this path with me, whether through giving moral support or providing useful ideas. Check out my list of published works below, feel free to contact me for questions or if you like more information about my research.

 

Hokkien Theatre Across the Seas


Springer, 2019

This monograph offers the first detailed study of theatrical forms still practised by the Hokkien communities in Kinmen, Singapore and Taiwan. The 'Across the Seas' title adopts a maritime concept in that these sites maintained a close connection through social and cultural exchange, which transcends beyond national boundaries. Despite originating from southern Fujian, the development of theatrical forms in all three sites was shaped by the political and social climate, which meant that localisation was inevitable. The book also documents traditional practices that are at risk of extinction. 

 

Asian Ethnology



“Negotiation” Between a Religious Art Form and the Secular State: Chinese Puppet Theater in Singapore and the Case Study of Sin Hoe Ping 


Volume 76, Number 1 • 2017, 117–144 


Exploring the dichotomy of tradition/modernity, secular/religious, and state-regulated/state-tolerated, this article uses the case study of the last surviving troupe of a minority group to discuss how it sustains itself in contemporary society. This includes displaying its expertise in traditional rituals when needed by its regional community and the flexibility to switch to a mode required by the mainstream.





CHINOPERL
(Chinese Opera and Performing Literature)



Making sense of orality in a highly literate society: gezai xi in Singapore 

 

 


Vol. 37, 2018, 1-41

 

 

​This study examines how a form of regional theatre has gone through its ups and downs, from its medium of performance being the lingua franca to being restricted in everyday usage, and from taking the region by storm to having troupes disbanded one after the other. To keep up with ever-changing preferences, troupes use a customary performing style—improvisation—to their advantage and are still able to draw the attention of audiences, both old and new.   



Potehi : Glove Puppet Theatre in Southeast Asia and Taiwan 

Chapter 6: Potehi in Singapore: Survival and Change, pp. 65-80

This edited book is a collaboration by both scholars and practitioners to examine how a theatrical form from the site of origin--southern Fujian, is transmitted to the various sites of migration--Southeast Asia and Taiwan. The core focus is on how theatrical traditions originating from the same region, took on diverse forms of development which is subject to socio-political factors. My chapter presents a little studied subject--Hokkien glove puppet theatre in Singapore, which is based on a decade long of fieldwork and seeks to understand how this theatrical form deviated from its origin and continuously adjusts itself to stay relevant.


This book chapter is inspired by my study of middle-aged and elderly subjects, particularly those whose work nature is of an itinerant nature. These "digital immigrants", compared to the younger generation of "digital natives", are more prone to various risks, including loss of their smart devices, the lack of knowledge in accessing information from these devices, accessing malicious links etc. In general, this is a book that contributes to the study of the ubiquitous nature of mobile technology and also serves as a handbook for layman mobile users. 




Development of Cantonese Opera in Singapore

January 2013

This book is the first detailed survey of the development of Cantonese opera in Singapore covering both the pre-independence and post-independence eras. The study is based on first-hand accounts of existing Cantonese opera groups (apart from street opera troupes) and also secondary research from newspapers and archives. While past studies on Cantonese opera are mainly based on the aesthetics of the art form, this study examines the theatrical form with the social, economic and political changes of Singapore.

 

A Preliminary Study of Chaozhou (Teochew) Iron-stick Puppet Theatre in Singapore

Volume 51• 2019, 47-69

Special issue-Asian Puppet Theatres: Traditions, transitions, renditions

This is a preliminary study of a lesser known but historically prominent theatrical art form in Singapore. Other than tracing the development of Teochew puppet troupes in the past, this article also highlights the transnational/regional significance of puppetry in connecting Teochew communities in Southeast Asia, particularly Malaysia and Thailand. This article also includes a case study of Sin Ee Lye Heng, currently the last surviving Teochew puppet troupe in Singapore. 

Hokkien Theatre Across the Seas


Springer, 2019

This monograph offers the first detailed study of theatrical forms still practised by the Hokkien communities in Kinmen, Singapore and Taiwan. The 'Across the Seas' title adopts a maritime concept in that these sites maintained a close connection through social and cultural exchange, which transcends beyond national boundaries. Despite originating from southern Fujian, the development of theatrical forms in all three sites was shaped by the political and social climate, which meant that localisation was inevitable. The book also documents traditional practices that are at risk of extinction. 

 

Exploring the dichotomy of tradition/modernity, secular/religious, and state-regulated/state-tolerated, this article uses the case study of the last surviving troupe of a minority group to discuss how it sustains itself in contemporary society. This includes displaying its expertise in traditional rituals when needed by its regional community and the flexibility to switch to a mode required by the mainstream.





CHINOPERL
(Chinese Opera and Performing Literature)



Making sense of orality in a highly literate society: gezai xi in Singapore 

 


Vol. 37, 2018, 1-41

 

 

​This study examines how a form of regional theatre has gone through its ups and downs, from its medium of performance being the lingua franca to being restricted in everyday usage, and from taking the region by storm to having troupes disbanded one after the other. To keep up with ever-changing preferences, troupes use a customary performing style—improvisation—to their advantage and are still able to draw the attention of audiences, both old and new.   



This book chapter is inspired by my study of middle-aged and elderly subjects, particularly those whose work nature is of an itinerant nature. These "digital immigrants", compared to the younger generation of "digital natives", are more prone to various risks, including loss of their smart devices, the lack of knowledge in accessing information from these devices, accessing malicious links etc. In general, this is a book that contributes to the study of the ubiquitous nature of mobile technology and also serves as a handbook for layman mobile users. 




This book is the first detailed survey of the development of Cantonese opera in Singapore covering both the pre-independence and post-independence eras. The study is based on first-hand accounts of existing Cantonese opera groups (apart from street opera troupes) and also secondary research from newspapers and archives. While past studies on Cantonese opera are mainly based on the aesthetics of the art form, this study examines the theatrical form with the social, economic and political changes of Singapore.

Development of Cantonese Opera in Singapore

January 2013

Mobile Security and Privacy


How Cyber-Savvy are Older Mobile Users?
(Co-authored with K.-K.R. Choo, D. Fehrenbacher)

13 September 2016

Potehi : Glove Puppet Theatre in Southeast Asia and Taiwan 

Chapter 6: Potehi in Singapore: Survival and Change, pp. 65-80

This edited book is a collaboration by both scholars and practitioners to examine how a theatrical form from the site of origin--southern Fujian, is transmitted to the various sites of migration--Southeast Asia and Taiwan. The core focus is on how theatrical traditions originating from the same region, took on diverse forms of development which is subject to socio-political factors. My chapter presents a little studied subject--Hokkien glove puppet theatre in Singapore, which is based on a decade long of fieldwork and seeks to understand how this theatrical form deviated from its origin and continuously adjusts itself to stay relevant.


Asian Ethnology



“Negotiation” Between a Religious Art Form and the Secular State: Chinese Puppet Theater in Singapore and the Case Study of Sin Hoe Ping 

 


Volume 76, Number 1 • 2017, 117–144 

 

CAROLINE CHIA

© Caroline Chia 2017. 


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